What about that iWatch? It’s about the Software!

I’ve seen commentary that it’s “disappointingly familiar”, i.e. it looks just like several other computer watches, like the Pebble or even the iPod Nano attached to a strap. Or that it’s Much Ado About Nothing. But I think that commentary misses the point, because it focuses just on the hardware. 

It’s true that the Apple Watch hardware, at first glance, is kind of boring. I am really sorry to have to say that because it does seem like some world class design went into it, especially the amazing collection of straps, one more beautiful than the next. But still, it looks like a little rectangular computer thing on my wrist. That’s the hardware.

The software on the other hand is a breakthrough. I haven’t played with it but I sense that it contains one new invention after another and it will set a whole new standard that others will definitely imitate. 

So my prediction: the Apple Watch is like the first iPhone. In retrospect a little clunky, maybe a little slow, maybe without the battery life you would like. But it is a foundation on which will set the standard for wearables for a long time.

Worth reading: The Trouble With Harvard!

The most-read article in the history of [The New Republic] is not about war, politics, or great works of art. It’s about the admissions policies of a handful of elite universities, most prominently my employer, Harvard, which is figuratively and literally immolated on the cover. 

It’s not surprising that William Deresiewicz’s “Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League” has touched a nerve. Admission to the Ivies is increasingly seen as the bottleneck to a pipeline that feeds a trickle of young adults into the remaining lucrative sectors of our financialized, winner-take-all economy. And their capricious and opaque criteria have set off an arms race of credential mongering that is immiserating the teenagers and parents (in practice, mostly mothers) of the upper middle class.

Read more of the response here.

On Being a Female in Venture Capital

Interesting story…

My summer internship was full of many positive experiences. I won’t forget, though, the burning sensation I felt in my face every time a secretary walked into a room to remind a partner his next meeting had arrived. Or the strange pride I felt when the only woman on our bowling team hit a strike, putting her ahead of some of our male colleagues — even though we were on the same team, mind you! It will take years for the fealing of outsider-ness to fade. And I count this experience as one more step towards educating myself, a part of the millenial generation, that a lot needs to change in our time at the helm.

http://mitsloanblog.typepad.com/mba2015/2014/07/venture-capital-women.html

Worth reading: Don’t BS the American People About Iraq, Syria, and ISIL

This is worth looking at: The apparent beheading of American journalist James Foley by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) is a stark reminder of the group’s terrible brutality and the seriousness required to counter them.

“No one has offered a plausible strategy to defeat ISIL that does not include a major U.S. commitment on the ground and the renewal of functional governance on both sides of the Iraqi-Syrian border. And no one will, because none exists. But that has not prevented a slew of hacks and wonks from suggesting grandiose policy goals without paying serious attention to the costs of implementation and the fragility of the U.S. political consensus for achieving those goals. “

War on the rocks: Don’t BS the American People about Iraq and Isil