[GEEKY] List of Siri Commands

How to Use Siri – Full list of Siri Commands for iPhone, iPad, Video:

Below is a comprehensive Siri Commands List (updated for iOS6) for the new Siri Personal Assistant, optimized for mobile Safari browsers. These cool and useful Siri Commands can be used on your iPhone 5, iPhone 4s, iPad, iPad mini, and the iPod Touch. If you find this list helpful, or if you would like to add to our list of top Siri Commands, please use the comments section below.

 

Texting: Left and Right Hand of Government

Do you agree that prohibiting texting while driving is contradictory to texting as a way to deliver of major emergency messages?

“This week I noted a couple of different items that are a good example of the right hand of the Government not knowing what the left hand of the Government is doing, in the headlines this week. The first being that the Government is establishing a system to push Emergency Broadcast Alerts to our Cell Phones and other electronic widgets. The second is the banning of using Cell Phones while in a vehicle, so we could not get them while moving.” (from Software Safety Net)

I am all for prohibiting texting while driving. I admit that I rarely text anyway, but I do use my iPhone while behind the wheel, but never while the wheels are moving. I will pull over or do it at a red light. Oh yeah, if the phone rings while I am driving, I do answer it… Hmm. Need to rethink that part.

Siri and Text Messaging

A lot has been written about Siri (the new voice activated assistant in the iPhone 4s). I have to say that it works surprisingly well. It has been eerily accurate in properly transcribing my voice, although not quite as perfect in understanding what I am saying.

I just had a 3 message dialog with someone over text messaging using Siri. I never ever would have done that with texting previously but here I went speaking in complete sentences over text messaging and with 100% accurate recognition. I don’t know if the other guy was using Siri but if he wasn’t he must have been annoyed by how quickly I responded with a full sentence 🙂

It occurs to me that the average length of text messages might become longer and longer with the advent of services like this. I wonder if that is at least part of the reason that Apple is now bypassing the mobile operators when doing iPhone to iPhone messaging.

Aw, come on: Apple iPhone spontaneously combusts aboard flight in Australia

This is just a weird story:

“An Apple iPhone spontaneously began smoking and emitting a red glow while aboard an airplane in Australia. Passengers aboard Regional Express flight ZL319 were welcomed to their destination in Sydney, Australia on Friday by a frightening ordeal. According to the airline, a passenger’s iPhone began “emitting a significant amount of dense smoke” shortly after the flight landed, and the smoke was accompanied by a red glow.” (from Bioy Genius Report)

Iphone flames

I don’t ‘get’ iTunes match

What I don’t get is the price. First I had to have bought the music (from Apple or someone else) and now I have to pay again ($24.95 per year) in order to make it all available over iCloud.  I think I will stick with my new favorite, Spotify.

I am sure I don’t fully understand the details, but it seems to me that the essential benefit that the new iTunes provide is that I can access my whole music collection (as far as it is ‘legal’) from any device attached to iCloud. Anything else?

Well, I think the very idea of ‘owning’ a music collection is antiquated. I mean it’s evidently inefficient that millions of people have a copy of the same bits that form “Let It Be” on each of their computers.

iCloud solves this, in one way. I have to buy the ‘Let it Be’ bits, persuade iCloud of that fact, and iCloud will let me access their copy of the same bits, from any device that I connect to iCloud. Ok.

Spotify (and other services like Rhapsody) solve this differently. They buy the bits and let me rent them for a tiny amount of money, $9.95 per month. Depending on how much new music I listen to this is more or less expensive than the combination of buying the song and paying iCloud to host it.

But the advantage is that the music I don’t listen to anymore doesn’t keep taking up room on my computer. And new music that becomes available is immediately available to be under the same subscription fee.

Here’s an article on ZDNet Asia, “iTunes Match: A solution for a problem that Apple helped create” , that is I agree with.

I wonder when this will come to iPhone!

This is a very unusual Android app that I came across. It looks like they are just starting so it’s a bit crude, but highly intriguing…

HappyTrack is an Android Application that gives you the chance to express how are you feeling and why. Every time you update your status this app will keep track of the time, place and reasons about your feelings. But that’s not all!” (from HappyTrack)

What do you think?

People forgot about iPhone 1.0

Funny to read this:

“The story started in 2007, with the release of the first iPhone. Led by its enigmatic leader Steve Jobs, Apple gave developers their first real taste of independence from the carrier oligarchy. The iPhone’s beauty was manifold, but first and foremost, it allowed developers to build applications and sell them for a fee — to users who could conveniently tap their iTunes account to buy things through the iPhone’s App Store. This bypassed the control of the carriers, which had long dictated what phones featured on their “decks.” (from How HTML5 will kill the native app)

Don’t you remember (it’s not so long ago) that when the iPhone came out, Apple and Steve Jobs were vehement against opening it up to developers? This is from October 1, 2007:

“We have been trying to come up with a solution to expand the capabilities of the iPhone by letting developers write great apps for it, yet keep the iPhone reliable and secure,” Jobs told developers at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June. That solution was Web-based applications, which is sort of like being told that you can’t buy a DVD because HBO shows that movie every month or so, and it was met with tepid applause by Apple’s developers.” (from “Trouble in iPhone Paradise“)