Aruba vs. CuraƧao

I admit I am always a little bit offended when I hear that a friend of mine (François?) chooses Aruba as a vacation destination. And it happens pretty regularly. Oh I always say that the two islands are very similar, but the truth is that I’ve spent very little time in Aruba, so… Anyway, for those of you who want to explore this delicate topic more deeply I present to you:

Aruba versus Curacao: Caribbean Showdown – Curaçao Chronicle:

At first glance Aruba and Curacao seem very similar. They’re both Dutch islands, they are about 75 miles apart from each other off of the coast of Venezuela and they even have most of the same cultural influences. But believe me; the two islands couldn’t be more different. These differences aren’t a bad thing; it’s just that some travelers will prefer one over the other depending on the type of vacation experience they’re looking for.

 

Looks like a fun book: “Cockpit Confidential”

The Many Mysteries of Air Travel – NYTimes.com:

If you’d like the answers, I highly recommend Patrick Smith’s new book, “Cockpit Confidential.” Mr. Smith is a pilot and blogger; much of the book’s format and contents are on display at his Web site, AskThePilot.com, or in the archives of the “Ask the Pilot” column he wrote for Salon.com for years.

 

Looked at the right way, this could be good news!

I came across this article a few days ago. The Ticktock of the Death Clock – NYTimes.com. Yes a depressing topic. The author muses on the wonderful internet resource DeathClock.com which purports to tell you, to the second, when you will die. Hah Hah funny.

Oddly though the article turns this topic into a positive and constructive messasge. Once the author sees that according to DeathClock.com he only has 18 years to go, he ups and quits his job:

Yes, just like that. Call me crazy. I worked as an editor and, ironically, my soon-to-be-former boss had once given me a copy of Malcolm Gladwell’s “Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking,” suggesting I needed to act more on impulse than rationality. I had previously underlined this particular section: “Decisions made very quickly can be every bit as good as decisions made cautiously and deliberately.

I skipped by the article online, came back the next day, read it again. Still I didn’t have the ‘nerve’ to visit DeathClock.com.

Realizing that 90% of what you find on the web is created by a pimply brazillian teenager working in the middle of the night (nothing against pimples) you know that you can’t take something like DeathClock.com seriously. Still it took me a few more days to visit DeathClock.com. And you know it didn’t depress me at all, it instead served as a kick in the pants to do more of the things that I love to do, and, as it says in the bible (?) “Don’t put off to tomorrow what you can do today!”

That’s my message to you, too.